Category Archives: Science

The Plastic Byproduct – Mental Illness Connection

It suddenly struck me that there might be a connection between the ubiquity of plastic products in our lives and the increasing number of people diagnosed with mental illness.

Seeing the uncritical way in which most people use plastic products especially in food preparation and storage, leaves me speechless sometimes. I mean it’s not that there isn’t enough information on the web about the harmful effects of plastic byproducts on our and especially our children’s health.

I was never a fan of plastic. Of course life without plastic is nearly impossible today because it is a cheap and versatile material and used nearly everywhere. But when food is concerned I minimize the use of it wherever I can: I mostly store food in glass or stainless steel containers. I don’t use plastic wrap (especially not for hot foods) and I don’t buy mineral water in plastic bottles. For cooking and serving food I use wooden or stainless steel spoons and dippers. And I just can’t stand plastic chopping boards – I have always used a wooden one. And when I buy take-away coffee I drink straight from the cup, not through the white plastic lid.

So here are some eye-openers for those interested:

https://www.google.co.il/amp/www.bewellbuzz.com/journalist-buzz/mental-illness-plastic-byproducts-connection-may-make-brain-sick/amp/?client=ms-android-om-lge

http://www.thenourishedpsychologist.com/bpa/

http://www.medicaldaily.com/bpa-free-plastic-worse-bpa-containing-products-similar-health-risks-identified-across-wide-2706

Plastics are Silent Killers

(Picture credit: http://www.longevitywarehouse.com/blog/the-dangers-of-plastic-and-what-you-can-do-to-be-safe/ )

Red

Recently, an impressive young lady told me that when she’s down she puts on red lipstick and it makes her feel better.

Red is such an exciting color! It explodes with energy, with life and passion. Red stimulates creativity and courage, while it can also have a very comforting, warming, and “hugging” effect. Looking at something red  – preferably a hue somewhere between true red and scarlet – definitely stirs something inside of me, activates senses and energy.

“A new branch of science called “colour psychology” has found that red can have a profound influence on our mood, perceptions and actions. Wearing red can even change your physiology and balance of hormones and alter your performance in a football match. So what is it about the shades of ruby, crimson, and scarlet that makes them so potent?”
Read more: How the color red warps the mind.

Picture Credit: Pomegranate and earrings – Heila; Others – Google pics, Makeup Gazette, playbuzz.com,  WKSU.

Water for Peace

wp-1474770431207.jpg

Israel has more water than it needs!

“…  “Now, that’s a pump!” Edo Bar-Zeev shouts to me over the din of the motors, grinning with undisguised awe at the scene before us. The reservoirs beneath us contain several feet of sand through which the seawater filters before making its way to a vast metal hangar, where it is transformed into enough drinking water to supply 1.5 million people.

We are standing above the new Sorek desalination plant, the largest reverse-osmosis desal facility in the world, and we are staring at Israel’s salvation. Just a few years ago, in the depths of its worst drought in at least 900 years, Israel was running out of water. Now it has a surplus. That remarkable turnaround was accomplished through national campaigns to conserve and reuse Israel’s meager water resources, but the biggest impact came from a new wave of desalination.

Bar-Zeev, who recently joined Israel’s Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research after completing his postdoc work at Yale University, is an expert on biofouling, which has always been an Achilles’ heel of desalination and one of the reasons it has been considered a last resort. Desal works by pushing saltwater into membranes containing microscopic pores. The water gets through, while the larger salt molecules are left behind. Microorganisms in seawater quickly colonize the membranes and block the pores, and controlling them requires periodic costly and chemical-intensive cleaning. But Bar-Zeev and colleaguesdeveloped a chemical-free system using porous lava stone to capture the microorganisms before they reach the membranes. It’s just one of many breakthroughs in membrane technology that have made desalination much more efficient. Israel now gets 55 percent of its domestic water from desalination, and that has helped to turn one of the world’s driest countries into the unlikeliest of water giants.

Driven by necessity, Israel is learning to squeeze more out of a drop of water than any country on Earth, and much of that learning is happening at the Zuckerberg Institute, where researchers have pioneered new techniques in drip irrigation, water treatment and desalination. They have developed resilient well systems for African villages and biological digesters than can halve the water usage of most homes.

Bar-Zeev believes that Israel’s solutions can help its parched neighbors, too — and in the process, bring together old enemies in common cause.The institute’s original mission was to improve life in Israel’s bone-dry Negev Desert, but the lessons look increasingly applicable to the entire Fertile Crescent. “The Middle East is drying up,” says Osnat Gillor, a professor at the Zuckerberg Institute who studies the use of recycled wastewater on crops. “The only country that isn’t suffering acute water stress is Israel.”

That water stress has been a major factor in the turmoil tearing apart the Middle East, but Bar-Zeev believes that Israel’s solutions can help its parched neighbors, too — and in the process, bring together old enemies in common cause.

Bar-Zeev acknowledges that water will likely be a source of conflict in the Middle East in the future. “But I believe water can be a bridge, through joint ventures,” he says. “And one of those ventures is desalination.”

Driven to Desperation

In 2008, Israel teetered on the edge of catastrophe. A decade-long drought had scorched the Fertile Crescent, and Israel’s largest source of freshwater, the Sea of Galilee, had dropped to within inches of the “black line” at which irreversible salt infiltration would flood the lake and ruin it forever. Water restrictions were imposed, and many farmers lost a year’s crops.

Their counterparts in Syria fared much worse. As the drought intensified and the water table plunged, Syria’s farmers chased it, drilling wells 100, 200, then 500 meters (300, 700, then 1,600 feet) down in a literal race to the bottom. Eventually, the wells ran dry and Syria’s farmland collapsed in an epic dust storm. More than a million farmers joined massive shantytowns on the outskirts of Aleppo, Homs, Damascus and other cities in a futile attempt to find work and purpose.

Water is driving the entire region to desperate acts.
…”

Complete article here

Picture credit