Category Archives: Mental Health

Walking Backwards

I have started walking backwards wherever possible. This might bring a big question mark to your face but walking backwards has proven health benefits for brain and body:

Mental benefits

  • enhanced sense of body awareness
  • increased body coordination and movement in space
  • helps avoid workout boredom
  • improves overall mood
  • helps with sleep cycles
  • motivates you to step outside your comfort zone
  • keeps your mind guessing
  • sharpens your thinking skills and enhances cognitive control
  • puts senses into overdrive, improving vision

Body benefits

  • increases strength in lesser-used leg muscles
  • helps rehabilitate knee injuries
  • improves walking technique and form
  • helps with balance
  • burns calories
  • helps you maintain a healthy weight
  • strengthens bones and muscles
  • boosts energy levels
  • elevates body’s metabolism

Source: http://www.healthline.com/health/fitness-exercise/walking-backwards

Disclaimer: The content of this post is based on personal experience. Please advise with a health or fitness professional before beginning any new physical activity.

More on backward walking:

Stimulate your Fitness IQ by walking backward

Walking backwards: Benefits and how to start

Walking backward reaps big health benefits

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Picture Credit: Weird Workouts: Treadmill Variations for Fitness Gains

Embrace Failure

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Cats don’t make mistakes. We are born perfect.

Most of us feel like beating ourselves up when we fail at something or make a mistake. Or get panic attacks like I used to. But hey, “Failure doesn’t mean the game is over, it means try again with experience” (L. Shlesinger).

Failure, and even more important, accepting and analyzing failure, is an indispensable part of learning, being successful and achieving greatness. At the moment, failure can be discouraging, but only if you let it.

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Doctors make mistakes. An inspiring TED talk by emergency-room physician Brian Goldmann.

Excerpt: “… let’s begin with a bit of baseball… I’m going to focus on one stat that I hope a lot of you have heard of. It’s called batting average. So we talk about a 300, a batter who bats 300. That means that ballplayer batted safely, hit safely three times out of 10 at bats. That means hit the ball into the outfield, it dropped, it didn’t get caught, and whoever tried to throw it to first base didn’t get there in time and the runner was safe.Three times out of 10. Do you know what they call a 300 hitter in Major League Baseball? Good, really good, maybe an all-star. Do you know what they call a 400 baseball hitter? That’s somebody who hit, by the way, four times safely out of every 10.Legendary — as in Ted Williams legendary — the last Major League Baseball player to hit over 400 during a regular season. Now let’s take this back into my world of medicine where I’m a lot more comfortable, or perhaps a bit less comfortable after what I’m going to talk to you about. Suppose you have appendicitis and you’re referred to a surgeon who’s batting 400 on appendectomies.(Laughter) Somehow this isn’t working out, is it?Now suppose you live in a certain part of a certain remote place and you have a loved one who has blockages in two coronary arteries and your family doctor refers that loved one to a cardiologist who’s batting 200 on angioplasties. But, but, you know what? She’s doing a lot better this year. She’s on the comeback trail. And she’s hitting a 257.Somehow this isn’t working. But I’m going to ask you a question. What do you think a batting average for a cardiac surgeon or a nurse practitioner or an orthopedic surgeon, an OBGYN, a paramedic is supposed to be?  …”

Age is Only a Number

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Bullshit!

How many times have you heard people say “Age is only a number”? Probably lots. Individuals who spit up this phrase are most probably either very young or they want to sell you something. They say it to comfort you, or to reassure themselves, or you really do look acceptable “for your age” and that’s their way of telling you.

Well friends, I just turned 55, I feel great most of the time – physically, mentally, and emotionally. But let’s be honest, getting old sucks!

10 years ago (it seems like yesterday… okay, the day before yesterday) when I turned 45, one day on the beach this absolutely perfect specimen of a suntanned, muscular lifeguard hit on me. Of all the young hot beauties on the beach he picked me. I was excited and flattered, of course. We had a one-night fling which I will never forget.

Today, I don’t wear a bikini anymore and even in a one-piece bathing suit I don’t feel like showing myself on the beach. My body has changed. Although I am still told that I am attractive, I know what the years have done to me. I don’t look like this  anymore. Maybe I just shouldn’t care. But being aesthetic was always important to me, whether it concerned myself or others.

Growing old means: your hair loses its pigment and turns gray, on the whole body, wherever you [still] have hair; on the other hand, women suddenly have to pluck stubble from around their mouth and chin, a place where they never had visible hair before. The skin turns wrinkly, saggy and gets old-age spots. Your once youthly perfect nails morph to gross, protruding pieces of ugliness (I’m not there yet but I’ve seen it on old people). Your eyes lose their shine. Body functions aren’t what they used to be. Getting up in the morning takes longer and might be accompanied by back pain or stiff limbs. Still think getting old is just a number?

But there are also a few good things that come with age: Learning to focus on what makes us feel good and being consequent enough to get rid of whatever and whoever is bad for us. The ability to enjoy the moment and be genuinely thankful for every day on which we are able to see the sun rise and set. Being able to help others and to enjoy the rewarding feeling and the sense of meaning it gives us.

And here is the best: Falling in love is possible at any age! And it does happen. At all ages.

Talk about Feelings with your Children

Prinz William urges parents and families to talk about mental health with their children. As he celebrates Father’s Day, he urges especially fathers to be more open about their feelings and not to neglect the often sensitive topic of their children’s mental and emotional wellbeing. Unresolved mental and emotional issues can “alter the course of a child’s life forever”, and lead to problems such as addiction, violence, suicide, and homelessness.

(Picture Credit)

Workaholism – Psychiatric Problems

A large Norwegian study found that workaholism often co-occurs with psychiatric disorders such as ADHD, OCD, and depression.
“The study showed that workaholics scored higher on all the psychiatric symptoms than non-workaholics. Among workaholics, the main findings were that:
32.7 per cent met ADHD criteria (12.7 per cent among non-workaholics).
25.6 per cent OCD criteria (8.7 per cent among non-workaholics).
33.8 per cent met anxiety criteria (119 per cent among non-workaholics).
8.9 per cent met depression criteria (2.6 per cent among non-workaholics).

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“Thus, taking work to the extreme may be a sign of deeper psychological or emotional issues. Whether this reflects overlapping genetic vulnerabilities, disorders leading to workaholism or, conversely, workaholism causing such disorders, remain uncertain,” says Schou Andreassen.” https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160525084547.htm