Category Archives: Health

The Plastic Byproduct – Mental Illness Connection

It suddenly struck me that there might be a connection between the ubiquity of plastic products in our lives and the increasing number of people diagnosed with mental illness.

Seeing the uncritical way in which most people use plastic products especially in food preparation and storage, leaves me speechless sometimes. I mean it’s not that there isn’t enough information on the web about the harmful effects of plastic byproducts on our and especially our children’s health.

I was never a fan of plastic. Of course life without plastic is nearly impossible today because it is a cheap and versatile material and used nearly everywhere. But when food is concerned I minimize the use of it wherever I can: I mostly store food in glass or stainless steel containers. I don’t use plastic wrap (especially not for hot foods) and I don’t buy mineral water in plastic bottles. For cooking and serving food I use wooden or stainless steel spoons and dippers. And I just can’t stand plastic chopping boards – I have always used a wooden one. And when I buy take-away coffee I drink straight from the cup, not through the white plastic lid.

So here are some eye-openers for those interested:

https://www.google.co.il/amp/www.bewellbuzz.com/journalist-buzz/mental-illness-plastic-byproducts-connection-may-make-brain-sick/amp/?client=ms-android-om-lge

http://www.thenourishedpsychologist.com/bpa/

http://www.medicaldaily.com/bpa-free-plastic-worse-bpa-containing-products-similar-health-risks-identified-across-wide-2706

Plastics are Silent Killers

(Picture credit: http://www.longevitywarehouse.com/blog/the-dangers-of-plastic-and-what-you-can-do-to-be-safe/ )

Loneliness is an Illness which Can be Healed

We All Need People.

“The person who tries to live alone will not succeed as a human being. His heart withers if it does not answer another heart. His mind shrinks away if he hears only the echoes of his own thoughts and finds no other inspiration.” – Pearl S. Buck

To keep us mentally and physically healthy we need to engage in mentally stimulating activities – do things that make us think, question, learn, err, understand, feel, develop, and LAUGH. Such activities include physical exercise, getting enough (but not too much) sleep, eating healthy food, minimizing stress, and, probably most important of all, connecting and interacting with other people.

Living a socially active and rich life develops our brain and our personality, and is vital for our well-being. Learning to interact socially is especially important for people coping with mental illness who often live isolated and lonely lives. Talking to friends and engaging in activities together helps us share and overcome fears, learn more about ourselves, acquire new skills, get new perspectives, and realize that we are not (coping) alone. Friends motivate us and make us feel loved and needed. Friends also make us feel miserable, which teaches us to say no and draw lines.

Here are some helpful tips on how to improve your social life and get to know people.

Age is Only a Number

20160721_153720-1-1

Bullshit!

How many times have you heard people say “Age is only a number”? Probably lots. Individuals who spit up this phrase are most probably either very young or they want to sell you something. They say it to comfort you, or to reassure themselves, or you really do look acceptable “for your age” and that’s their way of telling you.

Well friends, I just turned 55, I feel great most of the time – physically, mentally, and emotionally. But let’s be honest, getting old sucks!

10 years ago (it seems like yesterday… okay, the day before yesterday) when I turned 45, one day on the beach this absolutely perfect specimen of a suntanned, muscular lifeguard hit on me. Of all the young hot beauties on the beach he picked me. I was excited and flattered, of course. We had a one-night fling which I will never forget.

Today, I don’t wear a bikini anymore and even in a one-piece bathing suit I don’t feel like showing myself on the beach. My body has changed. Although I am still told that I am attractive, I know what the years have done to me. I don’t look like this  anymore. Maybe I just shouldn’t care. But being aesthetic was always important to me, whether it concerned myself or others.

Growing old means: your hair loses its pigment and turns gray, on the whole body, wherever you [still] have hair; on the other hand, women suddenly have to pluck stubble from around their mouth and chin, a place where they never had visible hair before. The skin turns wrinkly, saggy and gets old-age spots. Your once youthly perfect nails morph to gross, protruding pieces of ugliness (I’m not there yet but I’ve seen it on old people). Your eyes lose their shine. Body functions aren’t what they used to be. Getting up in the morning takes longer and might be accompanied by back pain or stiff limbs. Still think getting old is just a number?

But there are also a few good things that come with age: Learning to focus on what makes us feel good and being consequent enough to get rid of whatever and whoever is bad for us. The ability to enjoy the moment and be genuinely thankful for every day on which we are able to see the sun rise and set. Being able to help others and to enjoy the rewarding feeling and the sense of meaning it gives us.

And here is the best: Falling in love is possible at any age! And it does happen. At all ages.

Small Piece of Plastic

Israeli invention to save millions of lives. Bloodless and painless circumcision for adult males to reduce HIV infections by 60%-70%. Tzameret Fuerst, Co-Founder and CEO, presents PrePex before an audience of 13,000 participants in Washington DC, March 2013.

What a woman! Listen to her inspiring talk ( only six minutes) : 70% Less HIV in Africa

PrePex is the first and only device for non-surgical adult male circumcision for HIV prevention in resource limited settings. http://www.prepex.com

More info:

1) The New York Times:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/14/hea…

2) BBC World News:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-radio…

3) The New York Times:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/31/hea…

4) Clearinghouse on Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention:
An important aggregator of global scientific evidence on the subject matter. The site is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and managed by the United Nations (UNAIDS) with evidence provided by the World Health Organization, universities and global public health authorities. Reviewers that include Harvard University & John Hopkins University. http://www.malecircumcision.org

 

PrePex
Photo and Graphics: Yuval Baruchman